Post

Grains and Alternatives Explained

Your Quick Guide to Eating Healthier Grains

Post Image

A grain of rice contains 3 layers – the germ (inner layer packed full of vitamins and minerals), the endosperm (middle layer of starchy carbohydrates), and the bran (outer layer full of fibre). White rice is processed, which means that the germ and bran layers are removed, leaving only the calorie-dense carbohydrate layer.

Consider the alternative options to white rice below. These options will assist in increasing your nutrition with additional vitamins and minerals and you will get more value out of the food you eat!

Brown rice contains all three grain layers, so it is full of fibre and healthy nutrients. Per 100 grams of cooked brown rice, you get 112 calories, 2.3 grams of protein, 1.8 grams of fibre (vs. 0.3 grams in white rice), while also providing 11% of your daily manganese intake, and 5% of your Vitamin B6 intake. Brown rice also contains many antioxidants, meaning it can help reduce the risk of developing many chronic health conditions such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Quinoa is a type of seed that is rapidly growing in popularity as a grain alternative. Per 100 grams of cooked quinoa, you get 120 calories, 4.4 grams of protein, 2.8 grams of fibre, and it is a good source of manganese, phosphorus, folate, iron, magnesium, and zinc. Compared to white rice, this means that per serving, quinoa has double the protein and more fibre, vitamins, and minerals, which will help you feel “full” longer, with a more balanced energy level.

Cauliflower rice is another growing food trend that contains only 25 calories per cup of raw cauliflower yet is still packed full of vitamins and minerals. Per cup, it has 3 grams of fibre, 77% of your recommended daily intake of Vitamin C, 20% of your Vitamin K, 14% of your folate, 11% of your Vitamin B6, and smaller portions of potassium, manganese, magnesium, and phosphorus. The preparation method is also simple: put the cauliflower in a food processor (or buy ready-to-go packaged cauliflower rice), then replace it in any dish that you would normally eat white rice!

Bulgur is a whole grain cracked wheat that when cooked is similar in texture to couscous or quinoa. Per cup of cooked bulgur, you get 150 calories, 8 grams of fibre, 6 grams of protein, 14% of your daily recommended intake of magnesium, 10% of your Vitamin B6, and 9% of your iron. Bulgur is also very easy to cook and goes well with most recipes as a substitute for any kind of rice or couscous.

You May Also Like

Post Nutrition

Food Synergy

Post Nutrition

5 Foods You Are Eating Wrong

Post Nutrition

Diabetes Superfoods

Post Nutrition

5 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism

Post Nutrition

All About Organic

Post Nutrition

Antioxidants 101

Post Nutrition

Bacopa Monniera: A Herb to Enhance our Memory

Post Nutrition

An Apple a Day?

Post Nutrition

How Many Calories Are In Your Drink?

Post Nutrition

Non-Dairy Calcium Sources

Post Nutrition

The Root-Tootin Smoothie

Post Nutrition

Take Control of Food Cravings

Post Nutrition

Visual Exam for Nutritional Status

Post Nutrition

Foods that Help or Harm your Sleep

Post Nutrition

Get the Facts on Fat

Post Nutrition

Food Sensitivities

Post Nutrition

Raw Food Diet: Healthy or not?

Post Nutrition

Elimination Diet Protocol

Post Nutrition

Osteoporosis Diet Dangers

Post Nutrition

Artificial Sweeteners: Can going "sugar-free" result in weight gain?

Post Nutrition

Hydration Education!

Post Nutrition

Healthy Holiday Baking

Post Nutrition

Diet Trends

Post Nutrition

Grains and Alternatives Explained

Post Nutrition

Label Reading Tips

Post Nutrition

Cholesterol & Eggs

Post Nutrition

3 Simple Ways to Break the Fast Food Addiction

Post Nutrition

What's In Season? Support Your Local Farmers!

Post Nutrition

Sugar Cravings 101

Post Nutrition

Honey vs Sugar

Post Nutrition

Barbecue Basics

Post Nutrition

Sandwich Tips!

Post Nutrition

Back to School Healthy Snacking

Post Nutrition

When Should You Buy Organic?

Post Nutrition

Master the Grocery Store

Post Nutrition

Vegan and Vegetarian Proteins

Categories